2010-2022: How Different would be the results of the Semi-Finals with only the Public Vote?

A news that shook the waters of the competition took place earlier today. The EBU has announced changes to the voting process for the Eurovision Song Contest.

One of the most important changes are that now only the public will choose the finalists in the two semi-finals, while now global viewers from all around the world that do not participate in the competition will also be able to vote!

You can see all the changes HERE.

The most important question is, What would be the changes to the competition voting in the Semi-Finals if only the public chose the 10 finalists?

We will answer this question through this tribute, seeing which countries would have qualified for the final from 2010 to 2022, if only the public vote counted, and which would have ultimately failed to qualify due to the favour of the juries.

Changes in the Results (2010-2022)

2010

In 2010, the system of 50% juries and 50% public vote, was applied for the first time in the Semi-Finals. There we find the first differences.

In the first Semi-Final we would have the qualification of Finland who finished sixth in the TV audience, against Bosnia and Herzegovina who finished eleventh and were favored by the jury’s fifth place.

In the second Semi-Final, we would have the qualification of Lithuania and Sweden, against Israel and Ireland. In addition, the winner of the Semi-Final would be Azerbaijan and not Turkey.

Which means Sweden would have any disqualification  in their history at the competition.

2011

In the first Semi-Final, we would have the qualification of Armenia, Norway and Turkey, against Switzerland, Lithuania and Serbia. In fact, Lithuania was first by the juries and eleventh in the audience.

That means Turkey would have no elimination in their history in the competition.

In the second Semi-Final, we would only have the qualification of Belarus, against the fan favorite that year, Estonia.

2012

Another year with huge changes in the results of the semi finals. In the first Semi-Final we would have Switzerland qualifying instead of Hungary.

In the second Semi-Final we would have the qualification of Bulgaria and the Netherlands, instead of Malta and Ukraine. Also, Norway was last by the juries and was saved by the public.

With these results, Ukraine would have lost the record as the only country with a non stop qualification!

2013

Moving forward in 2013.

In the first Semi-Final, Croatia and Montenegro would have qualified against Estonia and Moldova. In fact, Moldova was third in the committees, while Montenegro was fourth in the audience.

In the second Semi-Final, Bulgaria and Switzerland would have qualified instead of Armenia and Georgia. While Romania would have been the winner of the semi final, instead of Azerbaijan.

2014

This year we can see two big changes. In the first Semi-Final we would have the qualification of Portugal instead of Azerbaijan, while in the second semi the qualification of Ireland, instead of Malta. In fact, Malta was third in the jury and twelfth in the audience.

2015

In the first Semi-Final we would have the qualification of Finland, instead of Hungary, while in the second the Czech Republic instead of Azerbaijan.

2016

Moving on to next year, because in the first Semi-Final we would have seen the qualification of Bosnia-Herzegovina, instead of the Czech Republic and in the second Semi-Final we would have the qualification of North Macedonia and Belarus, instead of Georgia and Israel.

Τhe winner of the second semi final would have been Ukraine with Janala, instead of Australia.

2017

In the first Semi-Final we would have the qualification of Finland instead of Australia, while in the second the qualification of Switzerland and Estonia, instead of Austria and Denmark. In fact, Australia was fifteenth in the audience and second in the juries.

2018

Let’s go to 2018 and see that in the first Semi-Final, we would have the qualification of Greece and Gianna Terzi, instead of Eugent Bushpepa, from Albania. Also, the winner would be Eleni Foureira and not Netta.

In the second Semi-Final, we would have Poland qualifying instead of the Netherlands, while the winner of the Semi-Final would be Denmark and not Norway. In fact, Denmark was twelfth in the juries.

2019

We can see some variations existing also in 2019.

Poland would once again go through to the final instead of Belarus, while the winner of the first Semi-Final would be Iceland rather than Australia.

In the second Semi-Final, Lithuania would have qualified  instead of Denmark, while the winner of the Semi-Final would have been Norway and not the Netherlands.

2021

Eurovision Song Contest came back after one year and in the first Semi-Final, we would have the qualification of Croatia with Albina, against Hooverphonic from Belgium. Finally, the winner of the Semi-Final would be Ukraine and not Malta.

In the second Semi-Final we would have the qualification of Denmark and Fyr og Flamme, against Angela Peristeri from Albania, while the winner of the Semi-Final was Finland, instead of Switzerland.

2022

Last but not least we have this year edition of the contest. In the first Semi-Final, we would have seen the qualification of Ronela from Albania and not Marius Bear from Switzerland.

Finally, in the second Semi-Final, we would have the qualification of Andromachi (last in the committees), against Nadir Rustamli, who had zero points in the televoting.

Conclusions

Which ones are favored by the new changes?

Based on the above, we notice that the removal of the juries from the Semi-Finals, can change a lot in the Semi-Final score, with obvious results in the Final as well.

The countries that we would say are favored by this change are Lithuania and Poland, countries with a large dispersion across Europe. Also, this change could make it easier for Turkey to return to the Competition.

The Balkan countries Bulgaria, Croatia, Montenegro, as well as Armenia, which has a strong diaspora, also benefit from the changes.

What are the implications?

Jury favourites, Azerbaijan, Australia and Malta seem to be finding the changes difficult in the competition as their qualification in recent years has been largely down to the juries.

Ranking changes

Changes are also observed in the ranking. In particular, audiences seem to prefer funny  presentations and ethnic and dance songs instead of ballads or vocally challenged entries in general that usually are more appreciated by the juries.

General Conclusion

With all the above, we can say that in 2023 the TV viewers seems to have the main responsibility with the results of the contest. Although, on the Grand Final we see the casual jurors deciding half of the results, things will changes dramatically since from this year the goal for a lot of countries will be to first reach the final by having a song that the public will support. This also means that EBU seems to want to attract more and more of the public attention, but what would happen if a lot of good entries stay out of the final and more and more “funny” songs qualify but the juries still ignore on their final voting?

What a country will have to do to win both is find the entry that can surprise both the viewers and the jurors on the final night.

Stay tuned to EurovisionFun for all developments regarding the 67th Eurovision Song Contest.

 

 

 

 

Bosnia & Herzegovina: The country will not return to Eurovision 2023!

BHRT, the public broadcaster of Bosnia & Herzegovina, confirmed yesterday, that they are not going to take part in Eurovision Song Contest 2023.

The broadcaster confirmed that there is no chance of returning for next year’s contest. The country had previously taken part in the 2016 contest in Stockholm, but later withdrew in 2017 due to financial problems. BHRT had explained in the past that it’s not likely to return to Eurovision in the near future, unless the method by which it is funded is resolved.

BHRT is a member of the European Broadcasting Union but as of now it is denied access to all of its services due to unpaid debts. That means that since December 2016, BHRT can’t take part in Eurovion and Junior Eurovision Song Contest.

The channel is in great econimic pressure and is on the verge of closing. Since 2017 the public TV of the Republic of Serpska has failed to provide BHRT with its allocation of the feeds collected in the region and as a result triggered a funding shortfall of over 32 million euros as of the end of 2021.

Bosnia & Herzegovina’s last participation was in 2016 with the song “Ljubav Je” by Dalan & Deen feat. Ana Rucner:

Stay tuned on Eurovisionfun for all the news regarding the Eurovision Song Contest 2023, in Liverpool!

Source: eurovoix.com 

Eurovision 2022: The Preliminary Rehearsal Schedule has been released!

The Preliminary Rehearsal Schedule for the 2022 Eurovision Song Contest has been released. As we have mentioned in a previous article, rehearsals will commence on April 30 at the PalaOlimpico in Turin.

The first rehearsal of the Greek delegation will take place on Sunday, May 1 at 13.40 CET, with the press conference following at 15.40 CET of the same day. Amanda’s second rehearsal will take place on Wednesday 4 May at 16.50 CET, with the press conference taking place at 18.00 CET.

The first rehearsal of the Cypriot delegation will take place on Monday, May 2 at 16.40 CET, with the press conference taking place at 18.40 CET of the same day. The second rehearsal of Andromache is scheduled for Friday, May 6 at 10.25 CET, with the interview at 11.35 CET.

You can see the full rehearsal schedule below (All times CET):

Eurovision πρόβες

 

The EurovisionFun YouTube Channel will provide live commentary of the rehearsals, so subscribe now!

At the same time, the rehearsals will be covered in our website, since our team will be in Turin for the 66th Eurovision Song Contest to inform you about everything in real time.

Stay tuned to Eurovisionfun for all the latest news!

Laka: “The problem of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Eurovision is also the religion of our representative”!

Laka is one of the most popular and successful songwriters in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In 2008 with his sister represented the country in Belgrade with the song Pokušaj, taking tenth place.

It is known that Bosnia and Herzegovina’s public broadcaster is facing significant financial problems, hence its abstention from the contest.

In a recent interview, Laka believes that financial resources can be found if the country’s broadcaster decides to return to the contest. But then the problem will be the choice of the artist and the religion / ethnicity to which he belongs. Laka, however, speaks with nostalgia about his previous participation and declares his presence in a possible comeback.

Once the state is interested in being promoted in Europe, money will be found for the Eurovision Song Contest, but it will still be difficult to choose who will represent the country, a Serb, a Croat, a Bosnian, a Christian or a Muslim. It was great for us at the Eurovision Song Contest, so I would love to participate in this event again.

Bosnia and Herzegovina, which in the 1990s was the focus of fierce fighting between Serbs on the one hand and Bosniaks and Croats on the other, is now a single state entity, with two federal republics and another autonomous region.

About 55% of the country belongs to the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, while the remaining 45% belongs to the Republika Srpska. There is even the small autonomous region of Brcko. In each of these federal districts, another ethnic group predominates. Demographically, about 50% of the population identifies as Bosniaks, 35% as Serbs, 10% as Croats, and the remaining 5% belong to other ethnicities.

The above puzzle, of course, from time to time created problems in the selection of the representative, since artists from the two most important components of the country (Bosniaks and Serbs) had to be selected.

Thus while e.g. in 2008 the country was represented by Laka, who is Bosnian, last year Marija Sestic, who is of Serbian origin, was chosen.

Laka addresses this problem with his above statement. However, we wish Bosnia and Herzegovina to return to the Eurovision Song Contest soon and give us other entries, such as Pokušaj, which you can enjoy below:

Source: avaz.ba

Bosnia-Herzegovina: Abstain from the Contest for another year

BHRT,Bosnia-Herzegovina‘s  national broadcaster confirmed on the esctoday.com website that the country will not return to the 65th Eurovision Song Contest.

The reason for abstaining, as in previous years, is the large debt of BHRT to the EBU.

The country of the former Yugoslavia completes the list of countries, together with Slovakia and Andorra, who have already announced that they will not participate in Eurovision 2020.

The country participated for the last time in 2016 when it was for the first time blocked in its history. Between 2013 and 2015, the country abstained from Eurovision. Bosnia-Herzegovina competed in the Grand Final for last time in  2012. The country’s representative for that year was Maya Sar with the song “Korake Ti Znam (I know your steps)” and won the 18th place.

The country’s best place is reduced back to 2006 when Hari Mata Hari, with the emblematic “Lejla“, won the 3rd place.

Source: esctoday.com